Welcome at MirBSD!

Sponsored by
HostEurope Logo

Welcome at MirBSD!

MirBSD is mirabilos’ Open Source playground. (You might also have arrived here looking for MirOS, MirPorts or MirSolutions — these are no longer. This website contains, however, a lot of historic information about those; see e.g. the About page linked to the left.) Primary way of contact is IRC (as, also, linked in the menu.) Please consider to donate if you like my work.

News / weblog

Nik wishes you to know that the Movim packaging sprint (sponsored by the DPL, thank you!) is handled under the umbrella of the Debian Edu sprint (similarily sponsored) since this package is handled by the Teckids Debian Task Force, personnel from Teckids e.V.

After arriving, I’ve started collecting knowledge first. I reviewed upstream’s composer.json file and Wiki page about dependencies and, after it quickly became apparent that we need much more information (e.g. which versions are in sid, what the package names are, and, most importantly, recursive dependencies), a Wiki page of our own grew. Then I made a hunt for information about how to package stuff that uses PHP Composer upstream, and found the, ahem, wonderfully abundant, structured, plentiful and clear documentation from the Debian PHP/PEAR Packaging team. (Some time and reverse-engineering later I figured out that we just ignore composer and read its control file in pkg-php-tools converting dependency information to Debian package relationships. Much time later I also figured out it mangles package names in a specific way and had to rename one of the packages I created in the meantime… thankfully before having uploaded it.) Quickly, the Wiki page grew listing the package names we’re supposed to use. I created a package which I could use as template for all others later.

The upstream Movim developer arrived as well — we have quite an amount of upstream developers of various projects attending MiniDebConf, to the joy of the attendees actually directly involved in Debian, and this makes things much easier, as he immediately started removing dependencies (to make our job easier) and fixing bugs and helping us understand how some of those dependencies work. (I also contributed code upstream that replaces some Unicode codepoints or sequences thereof, such as 3⃣ or ‼ or 👱🏻‍♀️, with <img…/> tags pointing to the SVG images shipped with Movim, with a description (generated from their Unicode names) in the alt attribute.)

Now, Saturday, all dependencies are packaged so far, although we’re still waiting for maintainer feedback for those two we’d need to NMU (or have them upload or us take the packages over); most are in NEW of course, but that’s no problem. Now we can tackle packaging Movim itself — I guess we’ll see whether those other packages actually work then ☺

We also had a chance to fix bugs in other packages, like guacamole-client and musescore.

In the meantime we’ve also had the chance to socialise, discuss, meet, etc. other Debian Developers and associates and enjoy the wonderful food and superb coffee of the “Cantina” at the venue; let me hereby express heartfelt thanks to the MiniDebConf organisation for this good location pick!

Update, later this night: we took over the remaining two packages with permission from their previous team and uploader, and have already started with actually packaging Movim, discovering untold gruesome things in the upstream of the two webfonts it bundles.

I’m currently working on an mksh(1) and bc(1) script that takes a pitch standard (e.g. “A₄ = 440 Hz” or “C₄ = 256 Hz”) and a config file describing a temperament (e.g. the usual equal temperament, or Pythagorean untempered pure fifths (with the wolf), or “just” intonation, Werckmeister Ⅲ, Vallotti or Bach/Lehman 1722 (to name a few; these are all temperaments that handle enharmonics the same or, for Pythagorean in out case, ignore the fact they’re unplayable). Temperaments are rule-based, like in ttuner. Well, I’m not quite there yet, but I’m already able to display the value for MuseScore to adjust its pitch standard (it can only take A₄-based values), a frequency table, and a list and table of cent deltas (useful for using or comparing with other tuners). Of course, right now, the cent deltas are all 0 because, well, they are equal temperament against equal temperament (as baseline), but I can calculate that with arbitrary and very high precision!

For outputting, I wanted to make the tables align nicely; column(1), which I normally use, was out because it always left-aligns, so I used string padding in Korn Shell — except I’m also a Unicode BMP fan, so I had F♯ and B♭ in my table headings, which were for some reason correctly right-aligned (for when the table values were integers) but not padded right when aligning with the decimal dot. So I worked around it, but also investigated.

Turns out that the desired length was used as second snprintf(3) argument, instead of, as in the right-align case, the buffer size. This worked only until multibyte characters happened. A fun bug, which only took about three minutes to find, and is covered by a new check in the testsuite even. Thought I’d share.

Feedback on and improvements for the tuner, once it’ll be done, are, of course, also welcome. I plan to port the algorithm (once I’ve got it down in a programming language I know well) to QML for inclusion in the tuner MuseScore plugin, even. Check here, for now, for my work in progress… it’s quite big already despite doing basically nothing. Foundation laid (or so…).

I’m currently working on consolidating mirsolutions.de (as my former business is long defunct) and “The MirOS Project” (that as of 2018 is also back to being my own one-man show / hobby) into www.mirbsd.org as my hobby / personal sorta homepage to not need any vhosts and simplify EU-DSGVO conformity. (I’ve also reduced logging.) Please excuse upheavals, as well as the continued presence of old, obsoleted or outdated content that may even be, as of now, completely wrong; I’ll fix it as time permits.

Today I’ve released another new CVS snapshot of the FixedMisc [MirOS] font; as usual, the tarball contains the font in BDF form, with no conflict with the system Fixed [Misc] font; sources for use (compilation, editing) with bdfctool(1) are in CVS.

The Intelpocalypse

2018-01-04
Tags: archaeology bug grml hardware pcli security

The unveiling of the three new CPU bug classes, collected in the two brandbugs “Meltdown” and “Spectre”, has mostly shocked the BSDs; I’ve got it on some authority that even FreeBSD was not informed ahead of time, left alone the others. Thanks to laffer1 from MidnightBSD for a couple of heads-up warnings into our direction!

Here’s what I could gather until now (please do correct me if I’m wrong):

Meltdown is specific to Intel® CPUs with out-of-order execution, that is, all P6-class (Pentium Pro/MMX, Pentium Ⅱ, but not Pentium Ⅰ/MMX) or newer (except old Atom) CPUs. It appears to allow user processes to read kernel memory, but not across VMs, nor to attack a hypervisor. A variant for ARM exists but AMD’s x86 CPUs are supposedly safe. The KAISER/FUCKWIT/UASS/KPTI patches for Linux fix this, at huge performance cost on x86, not so much on ARM, and no cost for unaffected CPU models (runtime detected).

Spectre affects x86, ARM, POWER CPUs and possibly others. I’ve not yet found information on whether it is also limited to CPUs with out-of-order executions, but it seems likely. SPARC CPUs might be safe; Solaris/SPARC64 is safe due to the way its memory addressing works. If the OOO execution assumption is true, 80486 and P5 class x86 CPUs are also safe. This one does allow cross-VM and hypervisor attacks, so if the bare metal CPU is vulnerable, SOL. There does not yet seem to be a generic fix; some hint at having to patch the compiler and recompile everything with a workaround that has a performance cost, even if the CPU is not affected, or was fixed with a microcode update. AMD’s x86 CPUs are partially hit, one of the variants does not work on them.

“CERT recommends throwing away your CPU and buying an non-vulnerable one” (thanks to El Reg), but nobody states which CPUs are not vulnerable.

At the present time, we suggest any MirBSD/i386 instances that run on any CPU other than an 80486 or P5-class (Pentium Ⅰ or a non-PPro MMX) to be restricted to single user or trusted user access only, and no untrusted software including ECMAscript to be run on them.

Watch this space for updates. Oh, and, if you know what you’re (and I’m) talking about, please, again, do provide me with information necessary to provide those updates, both to MirBSD and to this space. Thank you.


Read older news.

MirOS Logo